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Flashing or Revolving Lights on Emergency and Authorized Vehicles,

RULES AND REGULATIONS

Title 67--TRANSPORTATION

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

[67 PA. CODE CH. 173]

Flashing or Revolving Lights on Emergency and Authorized Vehicles

[37 Pa.B. 3242]
[Saturday, July 14, 2007]

   The Department of Transportation (Department), under 75 Pa.C.S. §§ 4571, 4572 and 6103 (relating to visual and audible signals on emergency vehicles; visual signals on authorized vehicles; and promulgation of rules and regulations by department), amends Chapter 173 to read as set forth in Annex A.

Purpose of Chapter

   This final-form rulemaking provides the limitations and requirements for flashing and revolving lighting on emergency and authorized vehicles. The purpose of Chapter 173 is to set forth the nature, display, color, standards and configuration for flashing, revolving and oscillating lights that may be displayed on emergency and authorized vehicles.

Purpose of the Final-Form Rulemaking

   The purpose of this final-form rulemaking is to provide greater flexibility and lighting options to ensure that emergency and authorized vehicles have adequate flashing or revolving lights. The final-form rulemaking allows the use of flashing and revolving lights which were not envisioned or available at the time the regulations were originally adopted. The final-form rulemaking also clarifies the flashing or revolving lighting options and requirements for an unmarked police car.

   The final-form rulemaking reflects the joint effort of the State Police and the Department. The State Police also solicited advice and recommendations from local police departments and other law enforcement officials throughout this Commonwealth as well as members of the emergency lighting industry.

Summary of Comments and Responses

§ 173.2.  Definitions.

   Comment: The Independent Regulatory Review Commission (IRRC) found the definition of ''intersection light'' unnecessary and too broad.

   Response: The Department considered IRRC's comments and amended the definition for clarity. The Department believes the definition remains necessary as the term continues to be used in the regulations to refer to lights mounted on the fenders of emergency vehicles which enhance the visibility of emergency vehicles as they pass through an intersection.

   Comment: IRRC expressed confusion about the use of the terms ''flashing light'' and ''oscillation.''

   Response: The Department deleted the definition of ''oscillation,'' added a definition of ''oscillating light'' and removed ''oscillation'' from the definition of ''flashing light.''

§ 173.3(a). Display requirements.

Subsection (a)--color

   Comment: A retired police officer, Michael DalPezzo, noted that there is no authorization for green lights designating command vehicles. He also opined that it is impossible to ''exceed'' standards for chromaticity coordinates.

   Response: There is no need for a particular vehicle to display green lights. Although flashing green lights are used to designate command areas, they are not specific to particular command vehicles. Under the Incident Command System, multiple agency response could potentially bring multiple vehicles equipped with green lights to an incident scene, causing confusion among responders as to where a command center was located. Further, a portable green light could be maintained in a vehicle and used as necessary at the scene of an emergency.

   With respect to the observation that it is impossible to exceed standards for chromaticity coordinates, it is important to note that the CIE 1931 standard was devised in 1931 using wavelengths of light that were perceived as specific colors by persons with normal visual acuity. The standard has been revised twice. Consequently, this language is intended to take into consideration any future revisions to the CIE 1931 standard.

Subsection (a)(3)--blue lights

   Comment: The City of Philadelphia Fire Department opined that personnel of for-profit ambulance services should not be authorized to use emergency lighting. IRRC questioned whether personnel from those services are eligible to use blue lights and asked who is the ''chief'' of a private company. IRRC and the Pennsylvania Emergency Health Services Council (PEHSC) asked whether ''quick responder services'' personnel can use blue lights and asked the Department to clarify the types of organizations that allow blue lights on personal vehicles.

   Response: The personnel of ambulance services are entitled to use blue lights on their personal vehicles in accordance with 75 Pa.C.S. § 4572. Under section 12 of the Emergency Medical Services Act (35 P. S. § 6932), ambulances in this Commonwealth must be licensed by the Department of Health whether they are for profit or not. The license requirements in 28 Pa. Code Chapter 1005 (relating to licensing of BLS and ALS ground ambulance services) require emergency lighting on all basic life support ambulances in conformance with 75 Pa.C.S. §§ 4571 and 4572. Therefore, the status of the agency as ''for profit,'' volunteer or municipally employed is moot. In addition, quick responder vehicles are covered by the definition of ''ambulance'' in 75 Pa.C.S. § 102 (relating to definitions) and should display red lights or a combination of red and white lights.

Subsection (a)(4)--combination red and blue lights

   Comment: The Chiefs of Police Association commented that only police officers should be allowed to use a combination of red and blue lights.

   Response: The authority for using combination red and blue lights is granted in 75 Pa.C.S. § 4571(b)(1) and extends to police, sheriff, coroner, medical examiner and fire police vehicles. The regulation cannot establish a narrower scope contrary to 75 Pa.C.S. § 4571(b)(1).

Subsection (a)(5)(iii)--yellow or amber lights

   Comment: IRRC commented that § 173.3(a)(5)(iii) should be simplified to state that these lights ''shall be mounted to only flash or shine rearward.'' Mr. DalPezzo recommended allowing fire police officers to use traffic control emergency light assemblies.

   Response: The Department considered and rejected Mr. DalPezzo's suggestion. Under 75 Pa.C.S. § 4571(b.1)(2), the use of traffic-control emergency directional light assemblies is limited to emergency vehicles. Privately-owned vehicles of fire police officers are not emergency vehicles and are regulated by 75 Pa.C.S. § 4572. Therefore, those vehicles are not entitled to use traffic-control emergency directional light assemblies. However, fire police vehicles that are owned by a fire company are entitled to use combination red and blue lights as well as traffic-control emergency directional light assemblies. In response to IRRC's comments, the Department amended the language of subsection (a)(5)(iii).

Subsection (a)(6)--white or clear lights

   Comment: The PEHSC asked about the rationale for increasing the number of white or flashing lights. The City of Philadelphia Fire Department and IRRC asked the Department to clarify whether a vehicle can have a total of four white or clear lights by combining a single light with a light-bar assembly. IRRC expressed three additional concerns about this section. First, the Department should clarify the need for and intent of the subsection and whether a light created from reflection by mirrors is counted as a separate and unique light. Second, subparagraphs (i) and (ii) may conflict with existing systems and procedures. Third, the phrase ''preemptive traffic control devices'' is not defined. Finally, Mr. DalPezzo opined that the restrictions in this section are unworkable and unenforceable.

   Response: The Department considered the comments received concerning this section and made revisions to clarify the section. The three white lights can only be used as part of a light bar assembly. In some light bar configurations, two white lights are used as intersection lights mounted on the outboard sides of the light bar. An optional third white light was added to allow for a forward-facing center-mounted light for the purpose of signaling traffic directly in front of an emergency vehicle. The Department has not included a definition of ''preemptive traffic control device'' insofar as the term seems self explanatory to mean a device which allows operators of emergency vehicles to preempt the operation of a traffic signal in accordance with 75 Pa.C.S. § 3105(g) (relating to drivers of emergency vehicles).

Subsection (a)(8)--utility lights

   Comment: IRRC and Mr. DalPezzo found this section unclear and confusing.

   Response: The Department revised the language of this subsection for clarification.

Subsection (b)--360° visibility

   Comment: IRRC recommended reformatting this section for clarity.

   Response: The Department accepted IRRC's suggestion and reformatted this subsection.

   Comment: The PEHSC recommended that front bumper-mounted lights should only be red.

   Response: The Department considered and rejected the PEHSC's suggestion to give emergency vehicles, other than ambulances, the option of using lights of other colors. Under 28 Pa. Code § 1005.10(b)(1) (relating to licensure and general operating standards), emergency lights on ambulances must conform to Federal standard KKK-A-1822E, which requires that front bumper-mounted lighting be red. Therefore, ambulances will not be affected by this change.

Subsection (c)--visibility of unmarked police vehicles

   The Pennsylvania State Association of Township Supervisors submitted a comment outside the public comment period regarding the provisions of this section. The comment misinterprets the section to limit the placement of lights on unmarked vehicles to those described in the section. The section does not prohibit the addition of other lights on unmarked vehicles as township or law enforcement official may see fit.

Subsection (d)--mounting location

   Comment: Mr. DalPezzo suggested adding subsection (d)(5) to address the mounting of blue lights on authorized vehicles. IRRC noted that subsection (d)(1)(v)(A) refers to ''private vehicles'' and ''emergency calls'' as defined by 75 Pa.C.S. § 102, but those are not separately-defined terms in 75 Pa.C.S. § 102. Mr. DalPezzo also found this section confusing. IRRC asked the Department to reformat subsection (d)(3)(i)(E)(i)--(iv) to conform to Pennsylvania Code and Bulletin Style Manual. With respect to subsection (d)(3)(ii), the Pennsylvania Chiefs of Police Association said that law enforcement should be able to put strobe packs inside corner parking lamps, break lamps or inside back-up lamps and the proposed rulemaking should permit the use of flash back-up white lamps in conjunction with flashing red tail lamps. Finally, IRRC was unclear as to the intent of the restrictions in subsection (d)(4).

   Response: In consideration of these comments, subsection (d) was reformatted and amended for clarification. The Department considered and rejected Mr. DalPezzo's suggestion of adding subsection (d)(5) to address mounting of blue lights. The mounting of lights is already addressed in subsection (e)(3), which applies to authorized vehicles regardless of the color of the light. With respect to the concern expressed by the Pennsylvania Chiefs of Police Association, police vehicles are entitled to use strobe packs at the listed locations on a vehicle in accordance with subsection (d)(2)(vii).

Statutory Authority

   The regulations are amended under the authority in 75 Pa.C.S. §§ 4571, 4572 and 6103.

Persons and Entities Affected

   The final-form rulemaking affects owners of emergency and authorized vehicles who are qualified to display flashing or revolving lights.

Fiscal Impact

   Implementation of the final-form rulemaking will not require the expenditure of additional funds by the Commonwealth or local municipalities. The final-form rulemaking will not impose additional costs on the regulated community and may reduce costs by providing more lighting options for emergency and authorized vehicles.

Regulatory Review

   Under section 5(a) of the Regulatory Review Act (71 P. S. § 745.5(a)), on December 6, 2005, the Department submitted a copy of the notice of proposed rulemaking, published at 35 Pa.B. 6769 (December 17, 2005), to IRRC and the Chairpersons of the House and Senate Transportation Committees for review and comment.

   Under section 5(c) of the Regulatory Review Act, IRRC and the Committees were provided with copies of the comments received during the public comment period, as well as other documents when requested. In preparing the final-form rulemaking, the Department has considered all comments from IRRC, the House and Senate Committees and the public.

   Under section 5.1(j.2) of the Regulatory Review Act (71 P. S. § 745.5a(j.2)), on June 6, 2007, the final-form rulemaking was deemed approved by the House and Senate Committees. Under section 5.1(e) of the Regulatory Review Act, IRRC met on June 7, 2007, and approved the final-form rulemaking.

Sunset Provisions

   This final-form rulemaking is effective upon publication following appropriate evaluation of comments, suggestions or objections received during the period allowed for public comment. The Department is not establishing a sunset date for these regulations, since these regulations are needed to administer provisions required under 75 Pa.C.S. (relating to Vehicle Code). The Department, however, will continue to closely monitor the regulations for their effectiveness.

Contact Person

   The contact person for technical questions about the final-form rulemaking is Lawrence Allen, Equipment Division, 17th and Arsenal Boulevard, Harrisburg, PA 17120, (717) 787-2123.

Order

   The Department of Transportation orders that:

   (a)  The regulations of the Department, 67 Pa. Code Chapter 173, are amended by amending §§ 173.1--173.4 to read as set forth in Annex A.

   (b)  The Secretary of the Department shall submit this order and Annex A to the Office of General Counsel and the Office of Attorney General for approval as to legality and form, as required by law.

   (c)  The Secretary shall certify this order and Annex A and deposit them with the Legislative Reference Bureau as required by law.

   (d)  This order shall take effect upon publication in the Pennsylvania Bulletin.

ALLEN D. BIEHLER, P. E.,   
Secretary

(Editor's Note: For the text of the order of the Independent Regulatory Review Commission, relating to this document, see 37 Pa.B. 2909 (June 23, 2007).)

Fiscal Note:  Fiscal Note 18-404 remains valid for the final adoption of the subject regulations.

Annex A

TITLE 67.  TRANSPORTATION

PART I.  DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

Subpart A.  VEHICLE CODE PROVISIONS

ARTICLE VII.  VEHICLE CHARACTERISTICS

CHAPTER 173.  FLASHING OR REVOLVING LIGHTS ON EMERGENCY AND AUTHORIZED VEHICLES

§ 173.1. Purpose.

   This chapter pertains to the nature, display, color, minimum performance standards and configuration of flashing, oscillating or revolving lights that are permissible for display by emergency and authorized vehicles.

§ 173.2. Definitions.

   The following words and terms, when used in this chapter, have the following meanings, unless the context clearly indicates otherwise:

   Authorized vehicle--The term as defined in 75 Pa.C.S. § 102 (relating to definitions).

   Emergency vehicle--The term as defined in 75 Pa.C.S. § 102.

   Flash--An intermittent burst of light.

   Flash rate--The rate of flash, revolution or oscillation per minute of a single light, when that light is observed from a fixed position.

   Flashing headlamp system--A system designed to automatically flash the high intensity--high beam--portion of the headlamps of a vehicle in either an alternate or simultaneous flash. The system shall be designed so that activation of the high intensity--high beam--portion of the standard headlamp system overrides the flashing headlamp system.

   Flashing light--A light designed to flash by current interruption, or by other means providing an intermittent change in intensity when the light is observed from a fixed position.

   Hazard warning system--Driver-controlled flashing front and rear lights used to warn approaching motorists when a vehicle is broken down or is traveling at a slow speed.

   Intersection light--A flashing red, blue, white, or clear light used as part of a flashing, oscillating, or revolving light system to enhance the visibility of an emergency vehicle from the front and side as it approaches or travels through an intersection.

   Light activation indicator--An audible signal or an illuminated switch or pilot light which provides the driver of an emergency or authorized vehicle with a clearly audible or visible and continual indicator that a flashing or revolving light, flashing headlamp system, traffic control emergency directional light or authorized nonflashing or nonrevolving light is activated.

   Light-bar assembly--A device or devices designed and constructed to provide and display more than one steady burning, flashing, oscillating or revolving light.

   Oscillating light--A light designed to flash by movement back and forth between two or more points, including the alternation between the maximum and minimum voltage.

   Revolving light--A light designed to give the appearance of flashing by its rotation around a fixed axis through a 360° arc, on a horizontal plane.

   Single light--A device containing one or more lenses, lamps or bulbs which are designed to produce, when viewed from a fixed position or point, the appearance of one flashing or revolving beam of light.

   Traffic control emergency directional light assembly--A device electronically designed to display amber or yellow warning signal lights in a distinctive motion-lighting pattern--arrow left, arrow right, center out or alternately flashing--to warn motorists that they are approaching a hazard or to direct them around an impending hazard.

   Unmarked police vehicle--A police vehicle not equipped with a roof-mounted light-bar assembly. The vehicle may display graphics, markings or decals, identifying the agency or department.

§ 173.3.  Display requirements.

   (a)  Color. White, clear, red, blue, amber or yellow are the only colors permitted for use in flashing or revolving lights.

   (1)  Chromaticity coordinates. A flashing, revolving or oscillating light must meet or exceed the Chromaticity Coordinates, CIE 1931, Standard Colorimetric System as provided in SAE Standard J578d, Color Specification for Electrical Signal Lighting Devices, September 1978 or subsequent SAE Standards. This requirement does not apply to flashing headlamp systems.

   (2)  Red lights. A vehicle may display red lights as provided by 75 Pa.C.S. § 4571 (relating to visual and audible signals on emergency vehicles).

   (3)  Blue lights. A vehicle may display blue lights as provided for by 75 Pa.C.S. § 4572(a) (relating to visual signals on authorized vehicles). Vehicles described in 75 Pa.C.S. § 4572(a) may be equipped with a light-bar assembly using only blue lights. See Figure 3.1.

   (4)  Combination red-and-blue lights. Vehicles listed under 75 Pa.C.S. § 4571(b) may display combination red-and-blue lights. The privately-owned vehicles defined as an emergency vehicle under 75 Pa.C.S. § 102 (relating to definitions) must be equipped under 75 Pa.C.S. § 4571(a).

   (5)  Yellow or amber lights. A vehicle may display yellow or amber lights as follows:

   (i)  Under 75 Pa.C.S. § 4572(b), an authorized vehicle as defined in 75 Pa.C.S. § 102 and designated in Chapter 15 (relating to authorized vehicles and special operating privileges) may be equipped with flashing or revolving yellow or amber lights or one or more light-bar assemblies containing only yellow or amber lights. See Figure 3.1.

FIGURE 3.1

ILLUSTRATIONS OF LIGHT-BAR ASSEMBLIES *

 

 

Rotating halogen lamps--''V'' mirrors
(contains two single lights)

 

Rotating halogen lamps--''diamond'' mirrors
(contains four single lights)

   * THESE ILLUSTRATIONS REPRESENT TWO COMMON MODELS OF LIGHT-BAR ASSEMBLIES. OTHER LIGHT-BAR ASSEMBLIES MAY BE USED.

   (ii)  An authorized vehicle which is used in the construction, repair or maintenance of a bridge or highway maybe equipped with traffic control emergency directional light assemblies.

   (iii)  Emergency vehicles may be equipped with yellow or amber lights, in addition to traffic control emergency directional light assemblies. The yellow or amber lights shall be mounted on the rear of the vehicle or face rearward so that they are visible from behind the vehicle.

   (6)  White or clear lights. In addition to flashing or revolving red or combination red-and-blue lights, an emergency vehicle may be equipped with a flashing headlamp system and no more than one flashing, revolving or oscillating white or clear light, or with a light-bar assembly containing no more than three flashing, revolving or oscillating white or clear lights. The vehicle may also be equipped with additional preemptive traffic control devices.

   (i)  When the light-bar assembly contains three flashing, revolving or oscillating white or clear lights, the center light must be mounted to flash white or clear light only to the front.

   (ii)  When the vehicle is stationary, the light-bar assembly may not display white or clear light to the rear.

   (iii)  Flashing, revolving or oscillating white or clear lights and flashing headlamp systems may only be used in conjunction with the flashing or revolving red or combination red-and-blue lights. Flashing, revolving or oscillating white or clear lights and flashing headlamp systems that are not used in conjunction with flashing or revolving red or combination red-and-blue lights do not constitute visual signals under 75 Pa.C.S. §§ 3325 and 4571 (relating to duty of driver on approach of emergency vehicle; and visual and audible signals on emergency vehicles).

   (7)  Steady burning lights. Red, blue, amber or yellow nonflashing or nonrevolving lights--steady burning lights--may be used in conjunction with flashing or revolving lights.

   (8)  Utility lights. Clear or white forward or side facing steady burning utility lights (that is, take down, alley, spotlight) may not be used as a visual signal for purposes of 75 Pa.C.S. § 3325. These lights may be used while the vehicle is in motion or stationary for the purpose of an emergency, for the safety of the public, or in the enforcement of the law.

   (9)  Other lights. A vehicle, other than those identified in this chapter, may not be equipped with lights or systems identical or similar to those specified by this subsection, except that school buses and urban mass transit buses which will be used for carrying school children may be equipped with flashing lights as permitted by 75 Pa.C.S. §§ 4552(b) and 4553(a) (relating to general requirements for school buses; and general requirements for other vehicles transporting school children), and Chapters 15 and 171 (relating to school buses; and school vehicles).

   (10)  Hazard warning systems and turn signals. Hazard warning systems and turn signals are not considered flashing lights for the purposes of this chapter.

   (b)  360° visibility. Except for unmarked police vehicles, when flashing or revolving red, blue, yellow or amber lights are mounted on a vehicle, one or more of these lights shall be mounted to provide visibility to vehicles approaching from any direction (360° visibility), regardless of the method of mounting.

   (1)  When only one light is used to provide 360° visibility, this light must be in compliance with SAE Standard J845, 360° Emergency Warning Lamps, May 1997, or subsequent SAE Standards.

   (2)  When more than one light is used to provide 360° visibility, the number of lights used may not exceed those specified in 75 Pa.C.S. §§ 4571 and 4572.

   (c)  Visibility for unmarked police vehicles. When the combination of lights are mounted on an unmarked police vehicle, these lights shall be mounted to provide visibility to vehicles approaching from the front and rear, regardless of the method of mounting.

   (d)  Flash rate. The flash rate, when observed from a fixed position, must be between 60 and 260 flashes per minute. When the flash rate is produced by the interruption of current, the period of illumination must be long enough to permit the bulb to come to full brightness.

   (e)  Mounting location. The following applies to mounting locations for flashing or revolving lights:

   (1)  Emergency vehicles, except police vehicles. Flashing or revolving lights, excluding flashing headlamp systems, may be permanently mounted on the vehicle or attached to a mounting device, in a workmanlike manner, in the following locations only:

   (i)  On a cab or roof of the vehicle.

   (ii)  No more than 18 inches above the highest fixed point of the vehicle.

   (iii)  Behind, in front of, or on the grille of emergency vehicles. A flashing light may be mounted so as to flash through or in front of the grille on emergency vehicles when the vehicle is also equipped with one or more flashing or revolving red lights that meet the 360° visibility requirements of subsection (b).

   (iv)  With respect to fender intersection lights, close to the front upper edge of each front fender of an emergency vehicle and not protruding more than 2 inches from the fender.

   (v)  Inside of existing vehicular lighting modules/assemblies, such as headlights, parking lights, taillights. This does not include reverse lights.

   (A)  This subsection does not apply to privately owned vehicles that otherwise qualify as emergency vehicles as defined in 75 Pa.C.S. § 102.

   (B)  Vehicles mounting lights as outlined in this subsection must also mount, in another location, flashing or revolving lights that meet the 360° visibility requirements. This does not include reverse lights.

   (2)  Police vehicles. Flashing or revolving lights may be permanently mounted on the vehicle or attached to a mounting device, in a workmanlike manner, in the following locations only:

   (i)  On a cab or roof of the vehicle.

   (ii)  No more than 18 inches above the highest fixed point of the vehicle.

   (iii)  With respect to combination red-and-blue lights only, behind, in front of, or on the grille. Police vehicles mounting lights as outlined in this subsection must also mount flashing or revolving lights in another location visible from the front of the vehicle.

   (iv)  Inside the passenger compartment, clearly visible through the front windshield. (See original equipment manufacturer for mounting locations.)

   (v)  Inside the passenger compartment, clearly visible through the rear window.

   (vi)  In or on the trunk lid.

   (vii)  Inside of existing vehicular lighting modules/assemblies, such as headlights, parking lights, taillights (not including reverse lights). Police vehicles mounting lights as outlined in this subsection must also mount, in another location, flashing or revolving lights visible from the front and rear of the vehicle.

   (viii)  With respect to flashing lights only, within the nondriver's compartment-side window.

   (ix)  With respect to combination red-and-blue lights, in a location visible from the front and rear of the vehicle.

   (x)  With respect to fender intersection lights, close to the front upper edge of each front fender of a police vehicle and not protruding more than 2 inches from the fender.

   (xi)  With respect to motorcycles, at a location in accordance with the manufacturer's specifications.

   (3)  Authorized vehicles.

   (i)  Flashing or revolving lights may be permanently mounted on the vehicle or attached to a mounting device, in the following locations only:

   (A)  On a cab, cab protector or roof of the vehicle.

   (B)  No more than 18 inches above the highest fixed point of the vehicle.

   (C)  On the front or rear of the bed or body of an authorized vehicle.

   (D)  On the tailgate of an authorized vehicle.

   (E)  In a location other than as set forth in clauses (A)--(D) as needed to comply with the 360° requirement in subsection (b).

   (ii) The installation or use of additional flashing or strobe lights in existing vehicular lighting modules/assemblies, such as headlights, parking lights, taillights, is expressly prohibited.

   (4)  Traffic control emergency directional light assemblies. Traffic control emergency directional light assemblies may not interfere with permanently installed lights. These assemblies may be permanently mounted on the vehicle or attached to a mounting device, in a workmanlike manner, in a location visible to approaching traffic.

   (e)  Mounting devices. Flashing or revolving lights, excluding flashing headlamp systems, grille-mounted flashing lights and intersection lights, may be mounted on one of the following devices:

   (1)  A magnetic base.

   (2)  A roof rack, light-bar or other device that is welded or bolted onto the vehicle, or is mounted on the vehicle by using suction cups equipped with nylon or steel straps and clips which hook onto the drip rail or molding.

   (3)  A self-leveling gimbal device.

   (4)  Grommet mounting is acceptable for flush mounted flashing lights.

§ 173.4.  Wiring.

   Wiring shall be installed using the industry's best practices.

   (1)  Wiring must be primary SAE rated and be of proper gauge to handle applied load. Ground wiring must be of equal gauge.

   (2)  Wiring may not be loaded to more than 80% of its rated capacity.

   (3)  The wiring must be permanently installed and routed through the vehicle in a manner to avoid short circuits or interfering with the operation of the vehicle.

   (4)  Grommets shall be used when wires pass through bulkheads and other sharp metal surfaces.

   (5)  Each accessory will be protected with the proper circuit protection as recommended by the manufacturer (that is, fuses or circuit breakers). The main circuit protection will be as close to the power source as possible.

   (6)  Additional wiring installed for emergency equipment may not impede or compromise the original equipment manufacturer circuits or original equipment manufacturer equipment functions as intended by the vehicle manufacturer.

   (7)  Tapping power off of original equipment manufacture circuits, such as in fuse blocks, must be only as recommended by the vehicle manufacturer. Tapping power off air bag or ABS brake and brake light circuits is prohibited.

   (8)  These requirements do not apply to flashing or revolving lights that are attached to a vehicle with a magnetic base.

[Pa.B. Doc. No. 07-1234. Filed for public inspection July 13, 2007, 9:00 a.m.]



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